About MS

What is multiple sclerosis?

Multiple sclerosis is a chronic and often debilitating disease which attacks the central nervous system (the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves). It is the most common neurological disease in young adults and often attacks people at the time of their lives when they are planning families and building a career.

On average more than 10 people are diagnosed with MS every week.

The average age of diagnosis is between 20 and 40 years of age, although symptoms may begin much earlier, and three out of four people living with multiple sclerosis are women.

No two cases of multiple sclerosis are identical and the severity and progression of the condition cannot be predicted.

Facts about MS:

no two cases are the same
No two cases of multiple sclerosis are identical. 
The visible and invisible symptoms of multiple sclerosis vary from person to person.
  the average age of diagnosis
The average age of diagnosis is between 20-40 years of age, although children as young as 10 have been diagnosed.
  central nervous system
Multiple scleoris attacks the central nervous system (the brain, spinal cord and optic nerves).
         
no known cure
Multiple sclerosis is a lifelong disease for which there is no known cure.
  women
3/4 people living with multiple sclerosis are women.
  1 in 3 heart
Australians will be directly impacted through a diagnosed family member, friend  or colleague.

 

Is there a cure?

Unfortunately, there is no cure for multiple sclerosis…yet. But there are constantly new discoveries in research which help us step in the right direction to find better medicines, treatments and one day, a cure. 

How your support helps

Your support is an integral part of the equation as we work together to beat MS. 

See how every dollar you fundraise helps to support real people living every day with multiple sclerosis. Put yourself in the shoes of someone who lives with this disease (or even of a family member or carer), and imagine how your life might change.

The support from generous fundraisers and supporters like you means that nobody has to ever face MS alone. 

Each year:

phone  
18,000+ occasions people...

reach out and find a caring voice on the end of the line thanks to the MS Connect phone service, who provide support, care and advice when it is needed most.

screen  
More than 400 new people...

access a MS Peer Support group, providing connection for people living with MS and an important social outlet for what can be an isolating disease.

speech  
1,500+ people...

access free, specialised advice and guidance from a health professional through the MS Advisor programs, without having to travel or join a long waiting list.

medical  
Almost 16,000 people...

participate in MS Education programs to help them manage living with MS and the unpredictability of their symptoms.

 

Download MS Information Flyer or check out ms.org.au to find out more about multiple sclerosis.

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